Adjusting the Zankapfel Life

Brewing, Cats, and Moving

Potatoes!

Let’s be frank, shall we? Staples are intimidating to grow.  Tomatoes to put on your salad are bold but friendly plants.  Even a bit of mescalin (ed: I mean ‘mesclun’ … oops) for that salad is just a *baby* plant – not scary at all.  But to truly make my own BREAD!? I need to grow an entire plant to ripeness/death, harvest it, intensively process it just to get the usable *part*, and then process it again based on my intended use.

But in an attempt to ‘get off the grid’, does that really matter?  Am I going to cling to my privilege and be scared away from a plant because it… seems hard to grow?  Whine whine, I’m going to buy my flour from a company that buys ‘organic’ grain and ships it because the huge carbon footprint is more convenient, whine whine.  (see a previous post about noodles) So we’re making an attempt to grow a staple carbohydrate: potatoes!

Our potatoes are in two sections of the garden.  In one spot, near the onions, are some regularly planted late season varieties.  The other spot is an EXPERIMENT!  We built a POTATO BOX last month!

The concept of the box is pretty nifty (and simple).  The potatoes grow *up* rather than *out* and then you harvest them by pulling out the boards on the side and feeling around for your potatoes.  With this method, one should get quite a haul with a small investment in square feet.

We’ll see what actually happens.  The below picture is of the four plants this weekend, with two potted marigolds nestled between them.

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This entry was posted on May 31, 2012 by in Alternative Grains, Gardening, On the Homestead.

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